Tag Archives: drama

Building My Collection: Your Name Limited Collectors Edition

Few would dispute me if I said that the anime of 2016 was Makoto Shinkai’s gender-swapping, natural disaster romance, Your Name. Surely the biggest anime movie in foreign cinemas and the second biggest Japanese film in its own country the stats speak for themselves.

Fast forward a year and the home releases are making their way onto the shelves of the millions of fans that fell in love with the movie but there was a decision to make on exactly which edition of the film to buy. In the UK we had the option of a standard DVD, standard Blu-Ray, Steelbook edition Blu-ray or limited edition collectors set. Before I talk about the limited edition set, I’d just like to put on the record that I think it’s a great thing that more casual fans don’t have to spend huge amounts of money to get their hands on the movie – especially at the point of first release.

Now moving on I’d like to show you my copy of the limited collectors edition of the movie. It’s a pretty amazing set both on and off of the discs. So let’s get started!

The outer case is a chipboard box with art unique to this edition featuring the moment in the film Mitsuha and Taki meet face to face for the first time. There is the standard AllTheAnime information card lightly tacked onto the back of the box which can be removed without marking the box.

There are four elements to the set within the box: first up is the disc case itself which features the movie on both Blu-Ray and DVD as well as the soundtrack by RADWIMPS.

As well as the movie with both English and Japanese dubs (including Japanese or English editions of the soundtrack) both discs also contain a Japanese TV special featuring the director Makoto Shinkai and the voice actors of two main characters Mone Kamishiraishi and Ryunosuke Kamiki as well as the usual English and Japanese pre-release trailers and teasers.

This set earns it’s price tag by the extras though as next on the list is a set of 10 of high quality art cards showing scenes from the film, one of which is marked with a unique number of authenticity.

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There is also an A3 theatrical poster…

img_0527… but most impressive of all is surely the art/interviews book that as well as containing shots from the movie and interviews with the two lead voice actors contains a Q&A with director Makoto Shinkai and his original proposal for the film!

It is all in all a pretty impressive set, but there is still one little bonus that I’ve yet to show you. The so called ‘Red thread of fate’, popular in Asian folklore, is an important image within Your Name and AllTheAnime felt that it would be a nice gesture to include Mitsuha’s braid/Taki’s wristband.

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I’m not entirely sure what I’m going to do with that one – but it’s a nice extra to have.

There you have it then, the UK/ROI limited collectors edition of Your Name. At £49.99 it is a bit pricey, but it really is worth the extra and I’ve included the link to Zavvi (where it is exclusively available) below. I’ll also add some links for the other editions 🙂

Limited Edition

Steelbook Blu-Ray 

Standard Blu-Ray

Standard DVD

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Reaping the benefits of a 50 episode run in Eureka Seven

Each season we are treated to a swathe of new anime for three months, only to be given a new set afterwards. Anime today is commonly produced in 12 episode seasons, even a double cours, 24 episode series is something to be excited about. As anime fans, we are conditioned to get excited about shows that are long than the standard one or two cours: Death Note is three cours, the two incarnations of Full Metal Alchemist are four and five cours respectively. The big shounen anime of Naruto, Bleach, One Piece, Hunter x Hunter, Fairy Tale and Dragon Ball are all significantly more than 100 episodes and hold massive fan bases because of it. I don’t follow any of those series but I am a fan of some longer shows that are less than 100 episodes.

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It’s not difficult to see why longer shows are popular. I’m thirty-three episodes into Eureka Seven’s fifty episodes and already it is proving why longer screen time can make for a better show. So then, without further ado, let me explain all.

Continue reading Reaping the benefits of a 50 episode run in Eureka Seven

The tale of the mistaken prince and an evil egg – a review of the Anthem of the Heart

It is not an uncommon trope in anime for young children to be catastrophically affected by an unfortunate event up until a time, in their middle or high school life, when they are forced to confront it.

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This is the case for the young, carefree dreamer Jun Naruse who inadvertently reveals to her mother that her father has been spending time at a love hotel with another woman. The separation leads both parents to cursing Jun for speaking too much, and from the girl’s imagination an egg is born, preventing her from speaking more under threat of stomach pain.

Continue reading The tale of the mistaken prince and an evil egg – a review of the Anthem of the Heart

First Impressions: Hyouka

On Friday I was lucky enough to get up to London for the first day of the second MCM of the year. While I was there I made some additions to my anime collection, most notably was the first part of the 2012 series, Hyouka. 

The show follows Hotaro Oreki, a dedicated ‘energy conserver’, attempting to get through his high school life doing as a little as possible to get by. After a letter from his travelling sister, he joins begrudgingly joins the Classical Literature club where he meets the enthusiastic and overbearing Eru Chitanda.

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Oreki is usually indifferent to Chitanda’s curiosity.

Episode one doesn’t waste time in getting down to the pull of this story: mystery. Eru is ‘curious’ about the Hotaro’s ability to solve the everyday mundane mystery which in the opening episodes range from how Eru gets herself locked in the club room to why a specific book was taken out only to be returned later the same day on five consecutive Fridays.

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Episode Focus: Tsuki ga Kirei 12, And Then

For a relatively simple anime, I felt there were several ways this final episode could go and, thankfully, the writers got all of the decisions spot on.

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We’re not left with any suspense at the start of this final episode – Kotarou failed his entrance exam. Unsurprisingly, he’s pretty dejected but initially it seemed as if all was going to be okay. The first five minutes of this episode epitomised for me just why the show generally has been so good: for both parties involved, it would be the natural response to try and put a brave face on this sad event, but inevitably (this is a relationship between 15 year olds, remember) things don’t stay as positive for all that long.

Continue reading Episode Focus: Tsuki ga Kirei 12, And Then

Review: Charlotte

I seem to remember writing a first impressions review back at the start of the summer being really, really excited about Charlotte. Jun Maeda, Key, P.A Works and super powers – what could possibly go wrong? Three months later, I’m here to tell all.

Background and plot

The premise to Charlotte is a simple but very good one: a proportion of adolescent teenagers have (albeit somewhat limited) superpowers, ranging from flight to telekinesis. The show follows the student council of a school full of such teenagers who are out to protect other ability users that are at risk of being caught and experimented on by evil scientists.

This is as deep as Yuu ever gets.
This is as deep as Yuu ever gets.

The show runs for 13 episodes and initially sets a very good pace, using the first five or so episodes getting to know the members of the student council, Nao, Joujirou, Yusa and Yuu as well as the laters younger sister, Ayumi. Charlotte really excels in the middle episodes where the development from the opening really pays off with plenty of really enjoyable, well done drama and action.

There are couple of gaping problems in the plot however: firstly, an event occurs which in many ways makes a lot of things that happen in the show pointless and makes no effort to rectify the issue later on in the show.

Continue reading Review: Charlotte

Charlotte Episode 11: Charlotte

In the past few weeks Charlotte has become this season’s anime to watch. What started off as a nostalgic Angel Beats! throwback has grown into a twist filled, action packed, feels heavy train ride into the trials and tribulations of Yuu Otasaka and those around him.

After last week’s episode it was hard to tell where the show was going with it’s final three episodes. The show had seemingly resolved what could have easily been a problem for the whole show. But this is Jun Maeda. So things won’t stop happening until the end of the thirteenth episode.

Very few things in anime are completely pointless.
Very few things in anime are completely pointless.

The episode opens by skipping the opening and reintroducing Yuu (again) and Mayumi to their older brother Shunsuke. For the first time in the show Yuu actually makes the decision to reflect on the scenario he has found himself in as well as what he has just been through. Compared to episode 7, Yuu shows some independence and maturity, while inwardly thinking of Nao, showing again the effect she has had on him as a person.

Continue reading Charlotte Episode 11: Charlotte

Review: Steins;Gate

In the past few weeks amongst the new and intriguing anime I’ve decided to watch I’ve been watching some of the most hyped and best rated anime out there. The amount of shows rated 10 on my My Anime List profile has increased by 200% (that is to say there are two more), since the start of May. Carrying on the trend of watching these supposedly incredible shows, I watched Steins;Gate. Is it as good as it’s #2 ranking on MAL would suggest, or was I about to be tragically let down?

Background and Plot

The show focuses on ‘mad scientist’ Rintarou Okabe (aka. Hououin Kyouma)  and his friends/lab members in their attempts to discover time travel and the subsequent consequences it has on their lives. The show begins when Okabe and his childhood friend Mayuri visit a conference on time travel only for Okabe to discover a young scientist, Makise Kurisu dead. After sending a text telling another of his friends, Daru of the death, he miraculously finds Kurisu alive.

She's dead. Well at least she is for the moment.
She’s dead. Well at least she is for the moment.

You can pretty much split the show into two halves, the first being the group’s attempt to find out how to time travel, the second being dealing with the consequences of messing with time.

In terms of genre, Steins;Gate, is all over the place. Principally it is a Sci-Fi comedy. That doesn’t really cover everything though, at times it’s dramatic and it can’t help but lean towards a harem at times. The scientific happenings can surely be described as supernatural with the affects of time travel being very psychological. Jack of all trades or what?

Continue reading Review: Steins;Gate